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A lot of Creative people have trouble being organised – or perhaps it only applies about my brain and Creative space!

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Although we LOVE the idea of being organised, the truth is a lot of us are also perfectionists which strangles our attempts at order. It’s never quite right . . . . either it’s not in a matching box, or it’s in the wrong place or you saw a storage idea on Pinterest that you just have to make.

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You know what I’m talking about!

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So this week I decided I had to stop pfaffing about, get a few things sorted and find a home for all my bibs ‘n bobs. It’s been quite a liberating experience.

  • Unused coloured A4 paper and stacks of old scrapbooking papers have been bundled into two giant shopping bags ready to donate to the local primary school,
  • random paper clips found everywhere are now housed in one tin,
  • my mishmash of unfinished projects are being stored in large ziplock bags – one bag per project,
  • stray paint tubes are making their way back to the paint tub, 
  • long forgotten and displaced stamps are back in their storage drawers,
  • and my T!m Holtz Distress Ink stamp pads are actually in one clean container and all the old blending foam pads have been discarded.

Colour run of BluesThen I got my rainbow ‘on’ by organising my Distress Ink stamp pad colours in proper order
. . . ROYGBIV . . .
Red  Orange  Yellow  Green  Blue  Indigo  Violet.

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I realised after doing this, that a little Colour Chart would be an ideal way to know quickly which Distress colours I had and which would be perfect for the project that I was ensconced in.

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Steps

  1. I wasn’t too finicky about the ROYGBIV order of my Distress colours
  2. I cut two pieces of copy paper in half – lengthways
  3. Using a chisel tip permanent marker, I wrote the name of the first colour onto the sheet
  4. I made sure that I ‘inked’ a decent section (6cm or 2.5″) of the paper, feathering out the density from right to left 
  5. I continued adding the name of the colour and then inking the edge
  6. I put a maximum of six colours onto each sheet
  7. I finished with four sheets of paper totalling 23 colours

Putting the four pieces together in a row
gave me a definitive ‘wow’ moment.

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All Four Sheets

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HOWEVER, one thing that struck me as I was loading each Blending Tool with a foam pad for each new colour, was that it was a pain-in-the-arse.

I seemed to have a dozen used foam pads in my container, but some colours had three pads and others had none!

My random system of matching foam pads with distress colours, was costing me money.

Not happy Jan!!

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Right View

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But then I had a moment of absolute genius strike me – why don’t I attach a foam pad to each stamp pad?
I’ll never have to forage madly in the container to find the perfect match EVER again.

Left View

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I already had hook&loop** strips, and because of my current cleaning & organising frenzy I knew exactly where they were.

Woo hoo!

I cut a 2cm (1″) strip for each Distress Ink pad (to go on the lid).

Hook Stuck

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I just adhered the piece of ‘hook’ with PVA, but to make sure there was a strong (and long-term) bond onto the lid, I weighted it down for a couple of hours.

I did this for all 23 lids, as I knew it was worth the effort.

Tape Dispenser

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Then I attached an individual foam pad to each stamp pad lid.

Foam Pads

Don’t they look awesome?

And so damn handy!

Rainbow of Distress Inks

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So what do you think?
Was it as good an idea as I thought it was?

Or am I twelve months behind every other crafter and just don’t realise it?!?

You can tell me – my feelings won’t be hurt.
Honest. xxx

** Hook & Loop is the product name
for what people usually call velcro
(which is actually a brand name)